International news within the industry of mining and metal, May, 22 2019
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"No need for a radical change of the Finnish Mining Act from 2011"

The new investigation will show how the Finnish mining law works in relation to the goals set in the Mining Act and how the relationship between the Mining Act and other central legislation on mining operations works. Image: Keliber OY
The new investigation will show how the Finnish mining law works in relation to the goals set in the Mining Act and how the relationship between the Mining Act and other central legislation on mining operations works. Image: Keliber OY
Published by
Markku Björkman - 30 Apr 2019

The study on development in the Finnish mining legislation is progressing. The preliminary observations in Juris Doctor Pekka Vihervuori's study on development needs in the mining legislation show that there is no need for a radical change of the Mining Act from 2011.

However, the need for change has emerged regarding the relationship between the Mining Act and other legislation that applies to mines. The final report with recommended measures will be published on June 15, 2019

On 1 March 2019, the Finnish Ministry of Employment and the Economy, in co-operation with the Ministry of the Environment, appointed a lawyer, Pekka Vihervuori, to investigate and evaluate how the mining law works in relation to the goals set in the Act and how the relationship between the Mining Act and other central legislation on mining operations works.

For the investigation, responses were obtained from stakeholder groups through a comprehensive questionnaire and a consultation meeting aimed at key players on April 2, 2019. In addition, there has been an open possibility to submit comments on the website dinåsikt.fi. The survey on mining and mining legislation can be answered in the service of the dinåsikt.fi.

The comments received by the investigation show so far that there has also been criticisms and comments on various change needs in a versatile way, both in the comprehensive system-related issues and in many details. On the other hand, the proposals have often been very different or contradictory, which is understandable in view of the nature of mining.

However, a comprehensive change to the Mining Act from 2011 was generally not considered to be justified in the comments, says the investigator. According to the investigator's preliminary recommendations, there is also no reason for a radical change. On the other hand, based on the comments and other investigations, it has emerged that there are potential development needs in the relationship between the Mining Act and other legislation that applies to mines. The preliminary observations and recommendations stated in the memorandum are supplemented in the investigator's final report, which will be published on June 15, 2019.

Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat
Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat

Chinese control half of the Congo's cobalt