International news within the industry of mining and metal, Apr, 24 2019
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"Recovering metals from e-waste is cheaper than pick up these from mines"

Gold, copper and other metals can be obtained from e-waste. Photo: Edelmann Umwelt GmbH
Gold, copper and other metals can be obtained from e-waste. Photo: Edelmann Umwelt GmbH
Published by
Markku Björkman - 19 Mar 2019

Electronic waste -- including discarded televisions, computers and mobile phones -- is one of the fastest-growing waste categories worldwide. For years, recyclers have gleaned usable parts, including metals, from this waste stream.

That makes sense from a sustainability perspective, but it's been unclear whether it's reasonable from an economic viewpoint. Now researchers report in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology that recovering gold, copper and other metals from e-waste is cheaper than obtaining these metals from mines.

Projections indicate that about 50 million tons of e-waste will be discarded around the world in 2018, according to the United Nations' Global E-waste Monitor report. This type of waste contains a surprising amount of metal.

For example, a typical cathode-ray tube TV contains almost a pound of copper and more than half a pound of aluminium, though it only holds about 0.02 ounces of gold. Xianlai Zeng, John A. Mathews and Jinhui Li obtained data from eight recycling companies in China to calculate the cost for extracting such metals from e-waste, a practice known as "urban mining."

Expenses included the costs for waste collection, labour, energy, material and transportation, as well as capital costs for the recyclers' equipment and buildings. These expenses are offset by government subsidies and by revenue from selling recovered materials and components.

The researchers conclude that with these offsets, it costs 13 times more to obtain these metals from ore than from urban mining. The researchers also draw implications for the economic prospects of urban mining as an alternative to virgin mining of ores, based on the "circular economy," or recirculation of resources.

Story Source:

The American Chemical Society

The property lies in the famous Cobalt province and is approximately 47 km south of the town of Cobalt. The picture shows an old mine in the town of Cobalt. In the early 1900s, the area was heavily mined for silver; the silver ore also contained cobalt. By 1910, the community was the fourth highest producer of silver in the world. Mining declined significantly by the 1930s, together with the local population. In late 2017 one publication referred to Cobalt as a ghost town, but the high demand for cobalt, used in making batteries for mobile devices and electric vehicles, is leading to great interest in the area among mining companies. Photo: Wikipedia, credit: P199
The property lies in the famous Cobalt province and is approximately 47 km south of the town of Cobalt. The picture shows an old mine in the town of Cobalt. In the early 1900s, the area was heavily mined for silver; the silver ore also contained cobalt. By 1910, the community was the fourth highest producer of silver in the world. Mining declined significantly by the 1930s, together with the local population. In late 2017 one publication referred to Cobalt as a ghost town, but the high demand for cobalt, used in making batteries for mobile devices and electric vehicles, is leading to great interest in the area among mining companies. Photo: Wikipedia, credit: P199

Quantum Cobalt Completes First Pass Exploration Near Temagami, Ontario

Sotkamo Silver consists of the parent company, Sotkamo Silver AB, with one wholly-owned subsidiary in Finland: Sotkamo Silver Oy. Sotkamo Silver develops silver, gold and zinc deposits in the Nordic region. The Company has completed the Definitive Feasibility Study for the Silver Mine project and is working on project financing issues. Photo: Sotkamo Silver
Sotkamo Silver consists of the parent company, Sotkamo Silver AB, with one wholly-owned subsidiary in Finland: Sotkamo Silver Oy. Sotkamo Silver develops silver, gold and zinc deposits in the Nordic region. The Company has completed the Definitive Feasibility Study for the Silver Mine project and is working on project financing issues. Photo: Sotkamo Silver

New silver mine opened in Finland

"150 trucks pro year"

The production of the first silver mine in Finland has started in Sotkamo. the mine of the Sotkamo...

The joint initiative called HYBRIT of SSAB, LKAB and Vattenfall – here with their three representatives at the fair, from right, Martin Pei technology manager at SSAB, Jan Moström CEO of LKAB and Martin Lindqvist, CEO of SSAB. HYBRIT is now on exhibit as an exciting sustainability collaboration at one of the worlds largest industrial trade fairs in Hanover. The CEOs of the three companies are in Germany to show the rest of Europe that it is possible to produce fossil free steel. Photo: SSAB
The joint initiative called HYBRIT of SSAB, LKAB and Vattenfall – here with their three representatives at the fair, from right, Martin Pei technology manager at SSAB, Jan Moström CEO of LKAB and Martin Lindqvist, CEO of SSAB. HYBRIT is now on exhibit as an exciting sustainability collaboration at one of the worlds largest industrial trade fairs in Hanover. The CEOs of the three companies are in Germany to show the rest of Europe that it is possible to produce fossil free steel. Photo: SSAB

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- The Swedish initiative for fossil-free steel production, HYBRIT, participates this week at the...