International news within the industry of mining and metal, May, 22 2019
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Turkish gold mine to boost output this year

Photo: Ariana Resources
Photo: Ariana Resources
Published by
Jaroslaw Adamowski - 13 Mar 2019

Production to rise London-based miner Ariana Resources has un-veiled its production guidance for the Kiziltepe mine in south-eastern Turkey for 2019, with plans to significantly expand its output.

“Notably, our gold production guidance for the JV is up 25% from last year’s guidance, and is estimated at circa 25,000 oz for the year, re-flecting a further increase in expected grades as we mine deeper into the Arzu South pit and the maintenance of high monthly mill through-puts,” the miner said in a statement. “Ore throughput to the mill during 2019 is expected at c. 195,000 tonnes, which represents a 30% in-crease over the feasibility plan.”

The Turkish mine is part of the Red Rabbit joint venture with Proccea Construction Co. in which Ariana Resources holds a 50% stake through the company’s shareholding in local firm Zenit Madencilik San. ve Tic. A.S.

Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat
Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat

Chinese control half of the Congo's cobalt