International news within the industry of mining and metal, May, 22 2019
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Canadian gold miner to boost production in 2019

Photo: Eldorado Gold
Photo: Eldorado Gold
Published by
Jaroslaw Adamowski - 25 Feb 2019

Output to rise Canadian miner Eldorado Gold has announced plans to boost its production in 2019, raising its guidance by 27% year-on-year to between 390,000 and 420,000 oz of gold.

 

For 2018, the miner reported a production of 349,147 oz of gold, “in-cluding 35,350 ounces of pre-commercial production from Lamaque,” according to Eldorado Gold’s statement.

 

The Lamaque project is located close to Val-d’Or, in Canada’s Que-bec.

 

“Eldorado’s growth is also supported by the strong momentum at La-maque. Less than two years after we acquired the asset, we are set to begin commercial gold production later this quarter. We expect total output at Lamaque, including pre-commercial production, in ex-cess of 100,000 ounces in 2019. We continue to focus on expansion possibilities through resource conversion, exploration drilling and in-creasing mill feed at this core asset,” said George Burns, the com-pany’s president and chief executive.

Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat
Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat

Chinese control half of the Congo's cobalt