International news within the industry of mining and metal, May, 22 2019
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"Terrafame is not going to compensate Talvivaara's destruction"

Aerial photograph of Talvivaara mine in Sotkamo, Finland. June 2013. In November 2012, there was a major leak from the gypsum waste pond, which is contaminated with nickel, uranium and other toxic metals. Finlands Environment Minister visited the site, after calling it - a serious environmental crime. The mining firm posted a 4.3 million euro loss in the third quarter of 2012, blaming weak output and low nickel prices. : Wikipedia, credit: Antti Lankinen
Aerial photograph of Talvivaara mine in Sotkamo, Finland. June 2013. In November 2012, there was a major leak from the gypsum waste pond, which is contaminated with nickel, uranium and other toxic metals. Finlands Environment Minister visited the site, after calling it - a serious environmental crime. The mining firm posted a 4.3 million euro loss in the third quarter of 2012, blaming weak output and low nickel prices. : Wikipedia, credit: Antti Lankinen
Published by
Markku Björkman - 24 Feb 2019

Terrafame, currently running the Talvivaara mine, should not take part in any legal proceedings, says the Finnish Minister of Economic Affairs.

The state does not intend to oblige Terrafame Oy, which currently runs the Talvivaara mine, to compensate landowners for the environmental damage caused by Talvivaara, says Mika Lintilä, Minister of Economic Affairs, to magazine Keskisuomalainen.

Terrafame, owned by the state with a 71 per cent stake, acquired the Talvivaara mine after Talvivaara Sotkamo Oy, which had previously operated mining, went bankrupt.

At the Kainuu District Court, there are currently about one hundred claims against Talvivaara Sotkamo Oy's bankruptcy estate. As part of Talvivaara, mining operations caused extensive environmental damage to the nearby lakes.

For example, Hannele Pokka, Permanent Secretary of the Finnish Ministry of the Environment, has proposed that Terrafame should assume responsibility for the damage caused by Talvivaara. The same view is given by Tapio Määttä, Professor of Environmental Law, who was interviewed last week by Uutissuomalainen.

- The state has pumped hundreds of millions of euros into the company. There is a special legal chatter if it doesn't pay. It's probably a few hundred or thousands of euros per property, Määttä said.

According to Lintilä, Terrafame has no reason to participate in the trial.

- The legal process concerns Talvivaara. It would be a strange procedure that Terrafame would go into that process, Lintilä says.

However, Lintilä reassures landowners that the damage will be compensated by the Environmental Insurance Center if the bankruptcy estate is unable to pay any compensation.

- The state is through it. The victims are not left without compensation, ”Lintilä says.

Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat
Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat

Chinese control half of the Congo's cobalt