International news within the industry of mining and metal, May, 22 2019
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 Environmental and water permit granted for Keliber Oy's Syväjärvi mining area

Photo: Keliber
Photo: Keliber
Published by
Simon Matthis - 20 Feb 2019

The Regional State Administrative Agency of Inner and Western Finland has granted an environmental and water permit for the Keliber Oy’s Syväjärvi mining area.

The Regional State Administrative Agency of Inner and Western Finland (“AVI”) has on February 20, 2019 granted an environmental permit to the Syväjärvi open pit mine and a water permit for the temporary drainage of the lakes Syväjärvi and Heinäjärvi. The granted permit includes ore and waste rock mining, stockpiling of waste rocks, construction of the areas needed for commencing the mining operation and the temporary drainage of Syväjärvi and Heinäjärvi lakes located in the mining area.

The environmental and water permit contain provisions, among other things, on the environmental protection structures, environmental impacts and their mitigation, discharges to water, air and soil, noise protection and monitoring and reporting of the environmental impact of the operations. The permit decision includes a security deposit for the extractive waste facilities and for ensuring waste management as well as the fisheries fee. The granted permit is not yet legally valid.

“AVI has done careful work in their decision on Syväjärvi environmental and water permit and it shows the functionality of the pre-consultancy procedure. This is an important milestone, along with the previously granted Syväjärvi mining permit, in the path of commencing our operations. We continue planning our future operations as well as preparations related to other key permitting processes”, says Pertti Lamberg, CEO of Keliber Oy.

Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat
Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat

Chinese control half of the Congo's cobalt