International news within the industry of mining and metal, May, 22 2019
Latest News

Sotkamo Silver invests in BAT technology

Map: Sotkamo Silver
Map: Sotkamo Silver
Published by
Simon Matthis - 13 Feb 2019

It has been decided to introduce a mechanical water treatment plant at the Silver Mine as part of a four-stage water treatment process. This is part of the mine's investment in the BAT technology (BAT = Best Available Technology).

 

The processes in the mechanical treatment plant, after chemical conditioning, are lamella sedimentation and sand filtration. In addition to these steps, the water treatment process includes the already existing clarification ponds and surface drainage fields. In addition to removing solids, water-soluble impurities are also removed from the water.

 

Sanitary wastewater is treated in a biochemical treatment plant inside the mining mine area. In addition to water treatment technology, we have invested in automation, a fast telecommunication network in the underground mine, engineering and ore sorting technology planning to be able to utilize the BAT technology, as well as in remote control of the production process and maintenance.

 

"We have taken into account the concerns of people in the area, considering the quality of the water leaving the mine, and have decided to invest in water treatment by introducing the mechanical water treatment already at this introductory stage of the mine project. With these additional efforts, we prepare for the capacity increase and take environmental aspects into account and also improve the efficient control of production using the BAT-technology", says Timo Lindborg, CEO of Sotkamo Silver AB.

 

Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat
Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat

Chinese control half of the Congo's cobalt