International news within the industry of mining and metal, May, 22 2019
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Ovako inaugurates new center for development of future steel solutions

Photo: Ovako
Photo: Ovako
Photo: Ovako
Photo: Ovako
Published by
Simon Matthis - 13 Feb 2019

Ovako has inaugurated a new research and visitor center in Hofors, the Ovako Science and Visitor Centre. The purpose of the center is to work together with customers in the development of new and innovative steel solutions that enable the production of high-performance components adapted to customer needs.

The new center gives customers the opportunity to be inspired and, together with Ovako’s specialists, develop innovative steel solutions adapted to customer needs. The new visitor center will be directly connected to Ovako’s Research and Development Unit, which plans to move into adjacent premises during fall 2019.

“We want the center to give visitors an overview of Ovako’s products and their applications in an interactive and inspiring way. It will provide opportunities for collaboration to identify and develop products that are optimally adapted for customer needs. Visitors to the center will also be able to take a virtual mill tour through Ovako’s production flow in an exciting way,” says Göran Nyström, EVP Group Marketing and Technology at Ovako.

Ovako’s research and development work is conducted by specialists focusing on steel manufacturing, metal working and product characteristics. Since Ovako produces steel with minimal content of impurities, it has a higher fatigue strength than conventional engineering steel. This means that customers can create lighter and stronger end products. Components can be made smaller while retaining the same properties, which also means reduced climate impact for the company’s customers.

Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat
Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat

Chinese control half of the Congo's cobalt