International news within the industry of mining and metal, May, 22 2019
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Australian miner obtains funds for African diamond project

Photo: Lucapa
Photo: Lucapa
Published by
Jaroslaw Adamowski - 04 Jan 2019

Australian miner Lucapa Diamond has secured ZAR 100 million (US$7 million) in funds to finance the development of its Mothae kimberlite diamond mine in Lesotho. The first sale of commercial diamonds from the project is expected in the first quarter of 2019.

The funds were provided by the Industrial Development Corporation of South Africa, the miner said in a statement.

Lucapa said that "commercial diamond recoveries have now commenced through the new 1.1Mtpa Mothae treatment plant, which is being ramped up to its nameplate capacity. The new Mothae plant includes advanced diamond recovery technology including two XRT modules designed to recover large and rare Type IIa diamonds ahead of the secondary crushing circuits to avoid breakage."

Lucapa holds a 70% stake in the African project, while the government of Lesotho has the remaining 30% of the shares.

Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat
Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat

Chinese control half of the Congo's cobalt