International news within the industry of mining and metal, May, 22 2019
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Huge lithium reserves in Portugal

The largest lithium mine in Europe is operated by Grupo Mota, Felmica, in the Guarda region, which is estimated to have reserves for 30 years of production. It has 5 more deposits in its possession. Photo: Felmica
The largest lithium mine in Europe is operated by Grupo Mota, Felmica, in the Guarda region, which is estimated to have reserves for 30 years of production. It has 5 more deposits in its possession. Photo: Felmica
Published by
Markku Björkman - 30 Sep 2018

Portugal seems to be sitting on huge reserves of the demanded metal lithium. As a leading European producer with a market share of 11 per cent, Portugal has the ambition to exploit new deposits.

Two large lithium mine projects are expected to be put into operation by 2020. Portugal already has the largest lithium mine in Europe. It is located in the Guarda area and is run by Felmica.

Estimated deposits are estimated to be sufficient for production 30 years ahead. British Savannah Resources plans to invest in a giant mine, Mina Do Barrosa with 20.1 million tons of ore and a lithium content of 1.0 per cent. Another mining project near the Spanish border, led by Portuguese companies, comprises 30 million tons of ore with a lithium content of 1.09 per cent.

Source: L'Usine Nouvelle
 

 

Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat
Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat

Chinese control half of the Congo's cobalt