International news within the industry of mining and metal, May, 22 2019
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Canadian gold miner acquires new property

Photo: Manitou Gold
Photo: Manitou Gold
Published by
Jaroslaw Adamowski - 28 Sep 2018

Canadas Manitou Gold has announced its acquisition of the Dog Lake Property, located within the Goudreau-Localsh deformation zone (GLDZ).

 

"The Dog Lake property is comprised of 82 mining claim units covering a total area of over 3,800 acres along the northern domain of the GLDZ. The property covers a number of historic gold showings associated with mineralized shear zones," the miner said in a statement.

 

The companys current property portfolio along the GLDZ includes the Goudreau Patents, consisting of 160 acres of surface and mining rights patented lands, and 15,900 acres of contiguous lands comprised of the Rockstar, Midas and Dog Lake properties, according to data released by the miner.

 

Set up in 2009, Manitou Gold is focused on the Gold Rock District of Canadas Northwestern Ontario. The firm is listed on the Toronto Stock Exchanges (TSX) Venture Exchange.

Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat
Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat

Chinese control half of the Congo's cobalt