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Odin Metals is permitted to prospect copper and silver in Sweden

The typical area with many lakes and forest and the possible place for mineral deposits in the province of Dalsland in Sweden. Photo: Wikimedia, OJohnson
The typical area with many lakes and forest and the possible place for mineral deposits in the province of Dalsland in Sweden. Photo: Wikimedia, OJohnson
Published by
Markku Björkman - 27 Sep 2018

The Australian exploration company Odin Metals has been granted exploration licenses for an area called Dingelvik 100 in Dalsland.

The license is valid for three years and mainly refers to copper and silver.

The application is based on studies of geology in the area, geochemical and geophysical material from SGU's databases, as well as historical work from older exploration and degradation in the area that demonstrates good potential for further findings. It writes the Bergsstaten in its decision.

The municipalities of Bengtsfors, DalsEds, Mellerud and Åmål municipality concerned have all objections to the state of the investigation and emphasize that the area is important for nature tourism. It is also used as drinking water. The property owners of Dingelvik 100 are also critical of the granting of the permit and a name list with more than 1000 signatures has been submitted to the Bergsstaten.

The area is more than 22,000 hectares large.
 

Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat
Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat

Chinese control half of the Congo's cobalt