International news within the industry of mining and metal, May, 22 2019
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Canadian miner discovers new copper zone

Photo: Kintavar Resources
Photo: Kintavar Resources
Published by
Jaroslaw Adamowski - 24 Sep 2018

Canadian miner Kintavar Exploration has an-nounced the discovery of a new copper zone, Irene, some 550 km north of the Sherlock corridor.

 

“The Irene zone is a major success for the explora-tion team. First it demonstrates again the efficiency of our explo-ration approach and following boulder fields to identify mineralization on the Mitchi project. This was a hidden target until the boulder field and the IP survey generated a drilling target,” Kiril Mugerman, the president and CEO of Kintavar, said in a statement. “Second, it ex-tends our exploration horizons more to the north where the favorable stratigraphy was not believed to be present based on historical map-ping. And finally, this is a new, mineralized, near surface hori-zon, that appears to be parallel to the main Sherlock zone with similar grades and same style of mineralization, which means more mineralized material in the Mitchi basin.”

 

Kintavar Exploration is based in Canada’s Quebec.

Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat
Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat

Chinese control half of the Congo's cobalt