International news within the industry of mining and metal, May, 22 2019
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Duterte wants to close all the mines in the Philippines

Duterte speaking at the World Economic Forum in Phnom Penh. Photo: Presidents office
Duterte speaking at the World Economic Forum in Phnom Penh. Photo: Presidents office
Published by
Markku Björkman - 23 Sep 2018

Philippines' President Rodrigo Duterte has not made himself known as a friend of mining, which he believes is environmentally destructive. He has previously ordered extensive closures of mines in the Philippines, which led to a sharp decline in the country's large export of nickel. The Philippines is the world's second largest nickel producer.

Now Duterte strikes up his abominable policy after a landslide on the golden island of Luzon that killed 54 people. The landslide was caused by the typhoon Mangkhut but the many small-scale mines in the region are considered to have aggravated the damage by weakening soil stability. According to the site of mineral technologies, Duterte has said he wants to stop all mining operations in the Philippines.
 

Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat
Cobalt mine in Democratic Republic Congo. About half of all mined cobalt comes from DRC, mainly from the province of Katanga. The mining takes place close to towns and villages. Local communities regularly are cut off from their farmland and water sources near mines, without having had a say in the matter. There are several examples of forced relocations of entire villages. Inhabitants of the village Kishiba, for example, were forced to move to make way for Frontier, a cobalt and copper mine. Their new homes in Kimfumpa lack the most basic of services such as clean water, fertile farmland, schools and health care. Photo: ECCJ Secretariat

Chinese control half of the Congo's cobalt